Q&A: Dave Hedeman of The Gone Ghosts Talks New Band’s EP

Get ready, Carrboro- this is Dave Hedeman as you’ve never heard him before. With his new band, The Gone Ghosts, Hedeman returns to his alt-country roots with deeply personal lyrics inspired by love and loss.

A veteran of the Southeastern music scene, Hedeman has been establishing favorite regional acts since the ’90s. From the formation of Arlington’s PuddleDuck in his college years, to rock outfit The Vagabond Union in Charleston, now Hedeman brings his take on alt-country to Carrboro with The Gone Ghosts.

In addition to being Hedeman’s return to Americana-influenced rock after playing straight rock ‘n roll with The Vagabond Union, this foray with The Gone Ghosts marks Hedeman’s most intimate lyrics to date. On the band’s first EP, Hedeman draws on his own experience, exploring failed romance and his father’s death. The EP is a raw, achingly beautiful testament to a musical life.

The Gone Ghosts herald the release of their self-titled debut at Cat’s Cradle Back Room on Friday, March 15th. You can find tickets here.

I caught up with Dave Hedeman on his musical origin story, his favorite track on the new EP, and how his experiences in the Southeastern music scene have shaped his sound.

What is your origin story?

I grew up outside Washington, D.C. in a very musical family, mostly on my mother’s side. Everyone played something. My grandfather played violin in his college symphony in Germany before immigrating to America before WWII. My mother and my aunt both played piano growing up, and between my brother, sister, my uncle and two cousins, they all played a variety of instruments ranging from piano, to clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, flute and, oh yeah, everyone played in the bell choir at church, which my aunt directed.

Then there was me. I played the drums. I started in fourth grade playing in the school band, and continued playing in some form through high school. Around that time, my brother got this autographed electric guitar from Van Halen that he won in a radio contest my sister signed him up for. He used to keep it under his bed tucked away. It wasn’t to be touched under the penalty of bodily harm. I’ve never really been one to follow rules, so when he left I would sneak it out of the case and pretend to play. Little by little I would try to figure out songs or melodies. I’m pretty sure I was more productive at smearing some of the autographs. But there was something about the guitar that kept drawing me to it.

When I went to college I had a friend who let me borrow his guitar and I spent a year and a half teaching myself how to play. Then in the spring of 1994, I started my first band, PuddleDuck, and the rest is history.

I’ve been playing music and making records now for twenty-five years. It’s just something I’ll always do, and there really is nothing I love more.

What inspired you to become a musician?

Even from a young age I remember pretending to be a rock star. One of my earliest memories was getting busted by my sister, lip syncing Rod Stewart’s “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy.” I was in the mirror really going for it and she barged in the room and started laughing at me. But it didn’t stop me.

I think though, looking back, it was my older brother that really opened me up to music. He was six years older and he had the line on all the best stuff. Bands like AC/DC, Black Sabbath, Iron Maiden, Van Halen, Motley Crue, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, The Grateful Dead.  All sorts of great stuff. I had the posters of all those bands all over my walls growing up and I would imagine being in those bands all the time.

But the real turning point for me was right after my father died. I was eighteen and my whole life was ahead of me. I made a promise to myself that I was gonna go after my dream… hell or high water. I’m so glad I did. I’ve had so many amazing musical experiences over the years and enough memories to last a lifetime.

You founded The Gone Ghosts out of the need to write more intimate lyrics that you didn’t feel fit The Vagabond Union’s rock sound. How did you decide that you needed to form another band to explore those lyrical capabilities?

When my longtime friend John and I started The Vagabond Union, I think we started with the intent to play more of an Americana style of music. I came from a more folk rock, alt-country approach, and John came from a more straight rock and alt-rock background.

As the band evolved, we started to move away from the original intent of the music and more towards the rock side of things. Which is great, because it was really new to me and super exciting. I continue to learn so much from those guys and I love that band. But the fact that everyone is living in different states makes it more of a challenge to play as often as I’d like.

So Dillon (Vagabond’s bass player) and I decided to start a local Carrboro/Chapel Hill band to play all of the songs that I’d written over the years that just didn’t quite fit with The Vagabond Union. I had some really personal songs lyrically that I had written that I really wanted people to hear, but stylistically it just didn’t mesh. So The Gone Ghosts created a platform for me to explore a range of songs closer to my personal writing style.

There are some slower and more ballad-like songs, and some mid-tempo songs with a little more space to explore, and sometimes even improvise and stretch the songs, which brings me back to some of my early musical roots.

What about alt-country and Americana-influenced rock felt more hospitable to personal lyrics?

Well, they say country music is “three chords and the truth.” And I think that’s how I try approach music. Americana and alt-country rock music lends itself to my style of writing. I just try to write songs that share my story and experiences, and then pair them with solid melodies and a good hook.

I wouldn’t say the style is more hospitable to personal lyrics, because I think you can find that across every genre of music. Trust me, if I could play in Iron Maiden I would, but that shit is too hard for me to play.  As much as I’d like to shred, I think this style suits me way better.

You’ve been playing up and down the Southeast for much of your musical career- from Richmond, Virginia with Puddleduck, to Charleston, South Carolina with The Vagabond Union, to The Gone Ghosts in Carrboro. How has your time in each place influenced your music?

There is something really special about this little corner of the U.S. The Southeast has influenced everything I’ve ever done musically. When I was first starting out in music, in the mid ’90s, in Virginia we all watched bands like Dave Matthews go from playing dive bars and clubs to becoming huge successes. It opened our eyes to the grassroots approach. Love them or hate them, they provided a lot of bands with a roadmap on how to go about all of it.

Charleston is going through a huge live music rebirth right now. That place is going off. It’s such a great community of musicians who all support each other from the top down. Bands like Shovels & Rope and Band of Horses are involved and care about the scene. They’re leading the way for up-and-comers like SUSTO, the Artisanals and tons of other amazing artists. But even better, the community is super supportive. People there go out to see live music all the time and everyone supports everyone. It’s really like nothing I’ve ever seen. I imagine it’s much like how Chapel Hill was in the late ’80s and early ’90s.

Which brings me to Carrboro. There is such a rich history here, you can’t help but be inspired. Although I’m not from here originally, I’m so proud to call Carrboro my home now. There is a special place in my heart here forever, because it was the amazing community of local musicians that encouraged me and gave me the confidence to get back into making music again. I can’t thank them enough.

There are so many amazingly talented people I’ve met here. That’s why it was really important for me to do everything locally with The Gone Ghosts. I wanted to record locally.

I want us to focus on playing locally for the most part, because I really want us to establish a strong connection with the place I call home now. I want to support the local music community, local clubs, local music stores because I think it’s important. I love it so much here and am thankful to live in a place like this.

What Southeastern musical traditions have you absorbed, and how do they influence the sound of Dave Hedeman & The Gone Ghosts?

That’s a tough question. I think I’m still learning about the musical traditions here. Coming in as an outsider, I recognize the strong connection this area has to its traditional music, like bluegrass and folk. You can see and hear its influence everywhere. It’s what makes this part of the world special.

I think for me it influences my songwriting. In many ways my songwriting is similar in its approach—I just choose to do it with loud electric guitars. But I imagine, if I were to strip down the songs and use more traditional instrumentation, you would see similarities pretty clearly.

If you had to pick one favorite song off of the new EP, Dave Hedeman & The Gone Ghosts, what would it be and why?

It’s a toss-up. I love love love “Die Here.” I think it really captures the overall sound I’m after. But on a personal level, “It Ain’t Easy” is really special to me. It marks a pivotal time in my life when I was dealing with tremendous loss and pain. Lyrically, I think it’s one of the best songs I’ve written to date.


Performance photos by Adina Davidson. Press photo by Rebecca Mill of Story Photographers.

Follow Dave Hedeman & The Gone Ghosts

Release Show Info and Tickets on Cat’s Cradle and Facebook

ReverbNation

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Twitter: @DaveGhosts

Instagram: @thegoneghosts

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More Q&As

Q&A: Raleigh Scratchboard Artist Dorian Monsalve

Q&A: Case Sensitive on Songwriting and Performance in the Triangle

Q&A: Synth-Pop Artist BREV. Explores Grief in the New Age

NC New Releases 🎵

In February and early March of 2019, NC artists greeted the end of winter with a spate of phenomenal new tunes from many genres.

This edition of NC New Releases is brought to you by February and early March of 2019. NC artists greeted the end of winter with a spate of phenomenal new tunes from many genres.

North Carolina did not come to play this month; from math rock fresh off the DIY scene in Greensboro, to old-time music with modern sensibilities out of Durham, to innovative beats from Greenville.

Whoever you are, whatever tunes you like to groove to, NC has a new release for everyone. Let’s go.

Allison de Groot & Tatiana Hargreaves

Powerhouses Allison de Groot and Tatiana Hargreaves debut their musical partnership with a fresh take on an old favorite, “Eighth of January.”

Considered among the finest of a new generation of old-time and bluegrass musicians, banjoist de Groot and fiddler Hargreaves are in top form on this much-recorded, much-beloved classic.

While Hargreaves and de Groot pay homage to the song’s long recording history, their interpretation of “Eighth of January” has a modern verve. Crisp production and sparkling technique honor the storied Southern traditional without getting bogged down in sentimentality. This recording is a tantalizing taste of the album to come.

You can follow Allison de Groot on her website, Facebook, and Instagram, and Tatiana Hargreaves on her website, Instagram andFacebook. You can stream “Eighth of January” and preorder the album on Bandcamp here.

Mo. Three

In one minute and twenty-five seconds, Mo. Three makes beat magic. The Greenville artist’s most recent release, Short ‘n Fancy, is, well- just that.

The playful mix of genre and orchestration paired with distinctive beats make for eight witty, memorable tracks to bump. “Fancy a Dance, m’lady?” is a great display of Mo. Three’s musical humor, while ROSES is as smooth as grooves get.

You can follow Mo. Three on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, and hear his appearance on episode four of Treee City’s Rainforest Café here. You can listen on Bandcamp here.

Terms x Conditions

On their thrashing first release, Excuse My Colours, products of the Greensboro DIY scene Terms x Conditions romp through jazz-infused math rock.

Everything beloved about math rock as a genre is present in Excuse My Colours. The classic atypical time signatures and technical precision are all brought to a fever pitch of scientific raucousness. Plus, every musician is excellent; though the wailing euphonium, saxophone, and trumpet are especially impressive.

Terms x Conditions are a commanding addition to the Greensboro DIY scene- and this release cements them as a band to watch.

You can follow Terms x Conditions on Facebook and Instagram, and stream the album on Bandcamp here.

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Q&A: Raleigh Scratchboard Artist Dorian Monsalve

A Q&A with Raleigh-based artist Dorian Monsalve, who brings fantastical visions to life in his surrealist scratchboard art.

Looking at Dorian Monsalve’s surrealist scratchboard art is like peering through an incredibly detailed kaleidoscope. Every glance reveals a new perspective. There are a multitude of vividly colored dimensions, each etched with unconventional shapes, textures, and ghoulish faces.

Scratchboard art- scratching away layers of ink on a clayboard to create images- captivated Monsalve since he first encountered the medium in high school.

Trained in Colombia and New Jersey, the now Raleigh-based Monsalve has exhibited in the Triangle since 2015. With solo and group exhibitions including CAMRaleigh, The ArtsCenter, Trophy Tap & Table, City Gallery, and merit awards from Litmus Gallery & Studios and the Maria V. Howard Arts Center, Monsalve’s work brings fantastical visions to the Triangle arts scene.

Monsalve walked me through his artistic process, the reception to his work in the Triangle, and how his art connects him with the universe.

When did you first encounter scratchboard art, and what were your initial impressions of the medium?

The first encounter with scratchboard was in high school in my senior year. I thought scratchboard was so fun to create images just by using a sharp tool and etching away the india ink through either lines or crosshatching. The best was the high contrast on the drawings and how detailed I could be with this medium.

Totem for a Broken Soul, Dorian Monsalve

Walk us through your artistic process. How do you go about selecting the colors you’ll use in a piece? Are the images you create planned in advance, or do they emerge organically as you create?

The white clayboard can be pre-inked with any colored ink you wish rather than the black india scratchboard that already comes pre-inked with black india. In order to apply the color you will have to etch the image, then paint, or just keep it black and white. Most of the time I’m using white clayboard. I select the ink colors, layer them and apply them randomly with different materials such as plastic, metal pieces, or any elements that create different textures.

Once the ink is dry, I start revealing the imagery and scape by rubbing a steel wool all around the piece. Then I visualize and explore, always finding faces or fantasy beings.  To bring the image forward or faded away I use a fiberglass brush, then for a more intricate detail I use x-acto blades, speedball tips of different sizes and tools that I invent. All imagery that emerges is from deep inside my being and from what I call the source, always inspired by instrumental music, nature, and the micro/macro cosmos.

Psychedelic Beast, Dorian Monsalve

You’ve been exhibiting in the Triangle since 2015. How would you describe the reception to your work in North Carolina?

My artwork has been appreciated and admired among artists and all public in general. My scratchboard art has been described as mysterious, macabre, dark and transforming (enlightening). The public has interacted with my work by looking through magnifying glasses that I provide to explore all the small details. The closer you get the more images are revealed.

Emergence of the Beast, Dorian Monsalve

You’ve often described experimental scratchboard art as a way of connecting with your inner self and the infinite. Your work tends toward the surrealistic, even the psychedelic. Do you find that surrealism is the most honest expression of your subconscious world?

I believe abstract, surrealism, psychedelic or even visionary art are just a word to label certain type of artworks. The soul is our/my most honest expression of ones/my subconscious world. It all comes from the source, God or however you wish to call it. “We are the instruments receiving divine energy from the source to materialize all beauty”.

Vortex III, Dorian Monsalve

You’ve been experimenting with scratchboard art for twelve years. What are you most looking forward to seeing in your personal artistic explorations of the medium, and in the wider world of scratchboard art?

What I am looking forward in seeing in my personal artistic journey with this medium is to accept, learn and experience all my soul and being by expressing sacred images, and bringing awareness that we are all one with the universe. The same way all the parts, organs, cells, even the microscopic atoms in our bodies are part of one single being. I am a reflection of the universe, so is my artwork.

Shaman Connection, Dorian Monsalve

All images courtesy of the artist.

Follow Dorian Monsalve

https://www.dorianscratchart.com

Facebook: @DorianMonsalveScratchArt

Instagram: @dorianmonsalve

Twitter: @dorian_monsalve

More Q&As

Q&A: Artist Britt Flood Gets Personal with Public Art in the Triangle

Q&A: Photographer Alex Yllanes Captures the Beauty of the Triangle

Q&A: Raleigh Rapper Sean Kyd on Ambition

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Cheap Chapel Hill Dates

Chapel Hill and Carrboro’s most inexpensive and atmospheric dates.

Maybe you’re a long-term couple and you’re saving up to buy Hopscotch tickets together. Maybe you’re single, mingling, and don’t want to shell out too much cash on a first Tinder date. Or you’re a student and you want to go out, but you’d also like to, y’know, eat food this month. Any way you slice it, we all want maximum romance at a minimum cost- so The Triangle Guide presents the “Cheap Dates” series. Up next, Chapel Hill’s most inexpensive and atmospheric dates. Frugal flirtation, here you come.

Drinks at The Baxter

For a dose of nostalgic, nerdy fun and reasonably priced beer, The Baxter Arcade on North Graham Street in Carrboro makes for a great date.

Whether you appreciate the history of the fifty vintage, all-original arcade games, or just want to try your hand at being a pinball wizard for an evening, Baxter Arcade is a great hangout for aficionados and newbies alike. Enjoy the cheerful pop art and count how many cultural references in the decor you and your date recognize.

With domestics going for $2.50, a 2 AM closing time, and an exciting mix of a crowd, The Baxter Arcade is a winning choice for fun, atmosphere, and frugality. Game on!

Ackland Art Museum

If strolling the halls of a museum and learning about your date’s taste in art appeals to you, Ackland Art Museum is a UNC institution with admission going for the best price of all: free. The museum’s permanent collection of 18,000 works offers something for art appreciators of all levels.

Whether you’re delighted by Asian and European masterworks, intrigued by twentieth century and contemporary art, or you just want to Snapchat pictures of ugly Renaissance babies, you’ll find what you’re looking for at Ackland Art Museum.

Nightlight

Ready to dance the night away? Nightlight on East Rosemary Street has you covered.

Housed in an unmissable pink building, Nightlight’s funky feel and well-curated selection of experimental live music and DJs make it a great stop for seeing if your date is really as good a dancer as they say.

Caffè Driade

Caffè Driade is easy to miss, so keep an eye out for the turn into a gravel driveway off of East Franklin Street. The most magical environs await.

Once you’ve parked, head for the brown, translucent-walled building tucked away in the woods. You’ll find Caffè Driade, a lovely coffee shop with a selection of pastries from local bakeries. String lights and tables cluster around the patios. You’ll feel as though you’ve stepped into another world.

A cup of brewed coffee here will set you back $1.50, though you can certainly spring for the array of tasty caffeinated beverages. Caffè Driade would make for a great morning coffee date- it opens at 7AM most days-but it would also make for a magical evening rendezvous. Grab a glass of wine, enjoy the fairytale atmosphere, and unwind on a Carolina evening until 10PM weeknights and 11PM on Friday and Saturday.

Weaver Street Market

A Weaver Street Market picnic is a quintessential Carrboro experience. This coop offers tons of tasty treats, so let your wallet be your guide as you choose something to snack on.

Then, grab a seat at one of the picnic tables out front and people-watch to your heart’s content. Watching the town of Carrboro pop in and out of the yard is one of the greatest pleasures of hanging out in town.

More Cheap Dates

Cheap Raleigh Dates

Cheap Durham Dates

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Dog Tested, Owner Approved: Fig and Oakwood Dog Park

Treat yourself and your dog to a walk on Brookside Drive in Raleigh, where Oakwood Dog Park and Fig offer fun for discerning dogs and owners.

I’m always looking for fun outings with my best friend, Summer. Here’s the complication: Summer is a dog.

Summer is ninety pounds of yellow fluff and personality, and I’m always looking for “dates” to take her on around town that will make her tail wag. If I get to taste-test something in the process, then it’s a win for everyone.

One of my favorite dog dates is to take Summer to Brookside Drive in Raleigh, where a great coffee shop and the best dog park in town are within walking distance of one another.

Fig

With tightly curated coffee, tea, and cocktail menus, Fig makes my favorite, a great Americano, and boasts beautiful decor. Dogs aren’t allowed inside, so save the gorgeous interior for your human pals.

However, there is a great option for when you have your dog in tow. There’s a convenient window at the front of the shop where you and your pooch can order, and then you can find a seat at the front or back patios.

Oakwood Dog Park

Now, Summer lives in a one-dog household, but she loves to socialize with other dogs, and sometimes, a few good butt sniffs on her daily walk just doesn’t do the trick.

A dog park is the answer, and for my money and Summer’s, the best dog park in town is a short walk away from Fig, just down Brookside Drive.

Just a little ways into Oakwood Park, there are two well-sized, fenced-in sections of a great dog park. The section on the left is for small dogs, and the section on the right is for big dogs. Summer, of course, goes to the right.

There are loads of trees to sniff, big buckets of water and a hose, clusters of plastic chairs and picnic tables, bags for dog business tied to the fence, and lots of friendly dogs and relaxed owners. Summer always has a great time.

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Premiere: Hear Wake Moody’s Debut Single, “Shivers”

Listen to Carrboro band Wake Moody’s debut single, “Shivers.” Lead singer Gabriel Reynolds shares how he brought the song’s seductive story to life.

With one sung note, Carrboro musician Gabriel Reynolds enters a new era as his band, Wake Moody, premieres their debut single, “Shivers.” That note- a sustained, Michael McDonald-esque exclamation- could be a cry of pleasure or a cry of despair.

In “Shivers,” Reynolds tells the story of a hookup with a friend who could’ve been much more, if the timing had been right.

That heartache could easily make for a maudlin track- but Wake Moody goes in the opposite direction. From beginning to end, “Shivers” feels like a visceral dive into indulgence.

Grooving to Heartbreak

“Shivers” is fun, seductive, with an appealing groove that propels the listener into temptation. The sleek production and dreamy synths all but banish the consequences of the encounter ‘til tomorrow. Reynolds really leans into his vocal performance: he slurs into that insistent rhythm, he husks, he hits a few really great belted notes. Musically, “Shivers” is all good vibes, great for dancing with a date.

But don’t be engulfed entirely by the fun- regret looms large over the lyrics.

Singing as one half of this one-night stand, Reynolds is beguiled by his failed love interest, impassioned; he’s also all too aware of the pain that lies ahead.

“Now we’re writhing at the bottom of the ocean/and when you say my name it isn’t in devotion,” croons Reynolds. The wordplay is satisfying- but it packs a poignant punch.

“Shivers” makes for a memorable calling card for Wake Moody. It also provides an exciting taste of the debut EP of the same title, due out in March.

Check out the premiere of Wake Moody’s debut single, “Shivers.”


“Shivers” is about the excitement and heartbreak of a one-night stand with an unrequited love. How did you approach making the story come to life, lyrically and sonically?

Sometimes I have to trick myself into expressing emotions. My guide in writing this song was a vivid mental picture of these two characters with a specific, messy history, and my role was just to observe them: let their story unfold and document their sexy mistakes.

It was easy to talk about these people from a distance. Then when I finished, that mental image came into greater focus and I realized – surprise – it was me.

I’d been projecting a real-life event I’d never worked through emotionally, and that fake distance I created finally allowed me to process the heartbreak, regret and disappointment from that time in my life. It was like a vivid dream, where you don’t realize the symbolism ‘til you wake up. I needed it.

I also wanted it to feel like part of a larger story, so the song starts with the word “and” then ends before you learn the consequences – to be continued. Then the next song on the EP continues the story, so that mystery lasts all of five seconds. But it’s cool to me. I like art that zooms in on a bigger picture.

As for the music, I’ve been an all-caps SAD BOY on stage before and didn’t like spreading that vibe, so the sound here is much sweeter than the story.

I definitely take notes from Frank Ocean, who knows how to make the surface feel at peace while there’s a darker story right underneath. He can write a song about a depressed rich kid throwing himself off a rooftop, and people play beer pong to it. Amazing.

If you had to characterize your writing process in three words, what would they be?

Feeling beats thinking.

All photos and album cover photo by Jillian Clark Photography. Album cover design by Ruben Rodriguez.

Follow Wake Moody

Facebook: @wakemoody

Website

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9 Alternative Ways to Celebrate Valentine’s Day 2019

Alternative ways to celebrate Valentine’s Day 2019 in the Triangle.

Not to knock the candlelit dinner or staying in with your fellow single friends, but for this Valentine’s Day, wouldn’t you rather do something a little different? The Triangle has plenty to offer for Valentine’s Day 2019…it’s just a matter of choosing your own alternative adventure.

Axe Your Ex

If you’re looking to let off some post-breakup steam, the folks at Epic Axe Throwing and Social House have a solution. This V-Day bash will include drink specials and a taco bar. Don’t forget to brush up on your throwing skills… every bullseye gets a box of chocolates!

Space is limited, so nab your ticket here.

Local Band Local Beer: Heartbreakin’ Ball

Raleigh favorite The Pour House is hosting a Valentine’s Day edition of Local Band Local Beer: a Heartbreakin’ Ball. If dancing to Lonnie Walker, AUTOSPKR, and Echo Courts and imbibing Foothills Brewing Co. beer sounds like a good time, grab a ticket here.

Goth Prom at Arcana

Whether you live a goth lifestyle year-round or just want to go goth for a night, you can groove all night at Arcana. This Valentine’s Day 21+ dance party has 20th Century Boy spinning classic goth, dark dance, and industrial music and tarot-themed cocktails.

Suggested dress code: black. Maybe a touch of red. And more black.

Check it out here.

Carolina Skies: Valentine Edition

It’s always a starry night at Morehead Planetarium. Get a love-themed tour of the universe in Chapel Hill on one of four dates, including February 14th. There’s even a special heartbreak edition on February 9th, if you feel so inclined.

More info and tickets here.

Okapi at The Cave

Asheville duo Okapi will light up The Cave with the upright bass and cello. With Ciera Mackensie opening, this is a night not to be missed.

Check out the Facebook event here.

SAD Valentine’s Party at Boxcar

Celebrate the single life with your friends AND support the Hands for Hearts Foundation at the Raleigh location of Boxcar Bar + Arcade. With DJ Chaperone spinning, artisanal cotton candy from Wonderpuff Cotton Candy, and a percentage of the night’s sales going to a good cause, this is fun you can feel good about.

Learn more here.

Crazy Doberman at Nightlight

Spend Valentine’s Night in Chapel Hill with Crazy Doberman, a “midwestern psycho jazz unit.” Nightlight is one of the best spots in the area to hear experimental tunes, so hit up W. Rosemary Street for a quirky, great time.

More info here.

Dream Date 90s Dance Party at Ruby Deluxe

If you want to get in your feelings with the music of your childhood, head to Ruby Deluxe at 10 PM. DJ Luxe Posh and DJ DNLTMS will spin 90s favorites at this 21+ dance party. Sweets, drink specials, and maybe some Whitney Houston- this is what Valentine’s Day should be.

Check it out here.

PHK is for Covers at The Pinhook

The Pinhook is hosting a night of covers of apathetic/anti bands and fundraising for the NC Women’s Prison Books Project. Come donate to this worthy cause and rock out/chuckle to covers of The White Stripes and Weezer. Good time + good cause = a great Valentine’s Day.

Read up on the event here.

For More Inspiration

For more date ideas that won’t break the bank, check out The Triangle Guide’s Cheap Date series: Durham and Raleigh editions.

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